• Tony
    is 11 years old and on the run.
Show thumbnails Hide thumbnails


More than 60 years of war have divided the vast land of Sudan. Even today, conflict still haunts children’s lives.

Sudan has suffered from internal and external conflicts since 1950.  Governance, traditional boundaries, and natural resource allocation—from grazing rights to oil—have added to the tensions. Africa’s longest civil war ended in 2005 with the signing of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) between northern and southern Sudan. The CPA included the referendum which led to the secession of South Sudan in 2011.

Armed conflict between Sudan and South Sudan continues along some of border.  Additionally, Darfur’s ten years of humanitarian emergency has reached some political conclusion, but the situation of vulnerable children and communities remains critical. 

Children have suffered markedly as a result of the decades of conflict in Sudan. Children and young people across the country - particularly those in the border states - face displacement, separation from their families, and the threat of violence.

Those children in IDP camps continue to go without many basic services and are at risk of disease, malnourishment, and abuse. Across Sudan, the impact of ongoing conflict and poverty can be felt in the lack of infrastructure and services: three million primary school-age children are currently out of school. 

What we do

Because of the high number of out-of-school children, War Child decided to entirely focus our Sudan programme on innovative education, as we believe this is crucial in the stable psychosocial development of a child growing up in a conflict-affected area. 

One of the key education challenges, however, is reaching children where the school infrastructure is extremely poor and will most likely remain so for the foreseeable future. To combat this, War Child is working to ensure that the current generation of children have access to quality education in order to support a sustainable future for their communities.