World Refugee Day - A Brighter Future For Refugee Children in Lebanon

June 20, 2019

Day of the Refugee Lebanon War Child
To mark World Refugee Day we present LOST - a new MFA-funded project that sees War Child work with Nuffic - the Dutch organisation for internationalisation in education. This special project is handing teachers the tools to improve the prospects and integration of refugee youth in Lebanon.

World Refugee Day

This World Refugee Day (20 June 2019) we have all been tasked with making displacement - the forced movement of people - a matter of global responsibility. Our ongoing collaboration with schools and education structures on the ground allow us to reach the children and youth most in need.

Our job is not over once refugee families safely reach host communities. Integration and safe spaces are key. So too is the willingness to trial new approaches. Learn more about our projects with refugees in Lebanon here. And show your support today by using the #WithRefugees hashtag.

Lebanon War Child project refugees

LOST is designed to support students (16-21 year-olds) affected by forced displacement

Photo: Hussein Baydoun

Support for students affected by forced displacement

The LOST project - implemented by the Lebanese Organisation for Studies and Training - provides vocational training and professional development opportunities for formal and non-formal teachers in Baalbek and Hermel in Lebanon - cities that have witnessed an influx of Syrian refugees in recent years.

LOST is designed to better equip teachers to support older students (16-21 year-olds) affected by forced displacement. Teachers benefit from expert guidance and coaching - and students enjoy a smoother transition into both the education system and the local community.

Teachers, parents and caregivers

The project sees teachers gain new skills in child protection, psychosocial support and trauma identification. Parents and caregivers become active members of parent-teacher councils - giving them a key role in their child’s schooling. And students take part in intensive English language courses - serving to boost their career prospects and involvement in the local community.

Lebanon War Child programma Lost education

Students taking part in the LOST programme

Improved prospects

Malak is just one of the students taking part in LOST. Malak is 17 and she arrived in Lebanon having fled the civil war in neighbouring Syria. She is enrolled in English classes in Baalbek - and her participation has had a significant effect on both her education and her personal life.

"Whenever my friends speak English I always feel left out, so this programme is the best solution to my problem," Malak explains. "I have become more confident since I can better understand and use English. I want to work hard to support myself.”

“As a Syrian girl living in Lebanon, my best chance and only hope is education."

Increased confidence

Malak’s father Ahmad has seen his daughter’s confidence soar following her participation in LOST. "Her views of the future have changed and her ambition has skyrocketed," he explains. "All this has increased my enthusiasm too and I work to motivate and support her."

“As a Syrian girl living in Lebanon, my best chance and only hope is education."
Malak (17)

About Nuffic

Nuffic Global Development creates opportunities for strong and sustainable partnerships between Dutch and foreign institutions. Our goal is to strengthen education to raise international knowledge levels. We want to collaborate to tackle today’s global challenges and create opportunities for the future.